North Carolina Not Among Healthiest States

North Carolina Not Among Healthiest States

CHARLOTTE, NC — An annual ranking released by the United Health Foundation ranks the healthiest states for 2017. North Carolina falls into the bottom third of the list. The rankings place the Tar Heel State as the 33rd healthiest state in the country, down one spot compared to its rankings the previous year.

The group’s annual "America’s Health Rankings" report published this month looks at 35 measures covering behaviors, community and environment, policy, clinical care and outcomes data. The report’s executive summary says that the country is facing serious public health challenges, including rising rates of premature death and an uneven concentration of healthcare providers.

According to the report, the premature death rate (death before the age of 75) increased for the third straight year in the United States. 2017 also saw an increase in the rates of cardiovascular and drug deaths nationwide. The report also found a wide disparity in the concentration of both mental health providers and of primary care physicians and dentists in the country.

The healthiest states in the U.S. for 2017 are:

Massachusetts Hawaii Vermont Utah Connecticut

The states that rank at the bottom of the report are:

Subscribe

West Virginia Alabama Arkansas Louisiana Mississippi

According to the report, North Carolina’s place in the rankings slid one spot from 2016, when it was No. 32. The state ranks 32nd for senior health and 30th for the health of women and children.

Some of North Carolina’s strengths highlighted in the report are a high immunization coverage among children, low occupational fatality rate and low prevalence of excessive drinking. Some of the challenges the state faces are a high infant mortality rate, a high percentage of uninsured residents, a high incidence of chlamydia.

In the past five years, drug deaths rose 14 percent in North Carolina, according to the report, and excessive drinking increased 18 percent among adults in the past three years. There is some good news, however. The number of children living in poverty has decreased 29 percent over the past three years, according to the report.

Patch Editor Deb Belt contributed to this report.

Image via Shutterstock

CHARLOTTE, NC — An annual ranking released by the United Health Foundation ranks the healthiest states for 2017. North Carolina falls into the bottom third of the list. The rankings place the Tar Heel State as the 33rd healthiest state in the country, down one spot compared to its rankings the previous year.

The group’s annual "America’s Health Rankings" report published this month looks at 35 measures covering behaviors, community and environment, policy, clinical care and outcomes data. The report’s executive summary says that the country is facing serious public health challenges, including rising rates of premature death and an uneven concentration of healthcare providers.

According to the report, the premature death rate (death before the age of 75) increased for the third straight year in the United States. 2017 also saw an increase in the rates of cardiovascular and drug deaths nationwide. The report also found a wide disparity in the concentration of both mental health providers and of primary care physicians and dentists in the country.

The healthiest states in the U.S. for 2017 are:

Massachusetts Hawaii Vermont Utah Connecticut

The states that rank at the bottom of the report are:

Subscribe

West Virginia Alabama Arkansas Louisiana Mississippi

According to the report, North Carolina’s place in the rankings slid one spot from 2016, when it was No. 32. The state ranks 32nd for senior health and 30th for the health of women and children.

Some of North Carolina’s strengths highlighted in the report are a high immunization coverage among children, low occupational fatality rate and low prevalence of excessive drinking. Some of the challenges the state faces are a high infant mortality rate, a high percentage of uninsured residents, a high incidence of chlamydia.

In the past five years, drug deaths rose 14 percent in North Carolina, according to the report, and excessive drinking increased 18 percent among adults in the past three years. There is some good news, however. The number of children living in poverty has decreased 29 percent over the past three years, according to the report.

Patch Editor Deb Belt contributed to this report.

Image via Shutterstock

Source Article

About The Author

admin